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OPEN HOURS

TUE:      6:30 - 7:30 pm

​WED:    4:15 - 7:30 pm

THUR:   6:30 - 8:30 pm

FRI:       4:15 - 7:00 pm

SAT:      9:15 am - 1:00 pm

 

ADDRESS

FIND​ US

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596 Mobil Ave, Suite E

Camarillo, CA 93010

CamarilloKenpo@gmail.com

Tel: 805-504-1357

 

Next to Jessica's Cafe!

 
Do you actually hit each other? Will I get hurt?

 

At Camarillo Kenpo, we are committed to providing a safe and educational environment for everyone and we take great care to prevent any injury to our students and instructors. At the same time, we are also committed to being a ‘light contact’ studio. Ultimately, Kenpo is the study of self-defense. We strongly believe that in a crisis situation you do not rise to the occasion. Instead, you sink to your level of training. As such, if you train in a ‘no contact’ studio, then if ever faced with a real self-defense situation it is unrealistic to believe that you will be able to defend yourself effectively. In essence, we believe that on the street facing an attacker is the last place you want to learn what it is like to make physical contact with another human being.

 

Beginning students are expected to make little or no contact with other students when practicing to ensure that no one gets hurt. The level of physical contact you make with other students will increase as you gain experience and greater control over your strikes. Once you reach an intermediate level, you will be expected to make light contact with fellow students in order to demonstrate that you can execute self-defense techniques effectively and in a controlled manner.

 

We believe in the same method that has been used for hundreds, if not thousands, of years to teach the martial arts. That is, by providing a controlled training environment where students can make light contact with one another we train our students to be true martial artists who are able to feel confident in their martial art, their ability to defend themselves and in their ability to take on any challenges life has to offer.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

 
I’m not very flexible. Can I do Kenpo?
Do I have to be athletic or particularly strong to do karate?

 

Kenpo Karate is designed to work for all different body types and athletic abilities. Kenpo relies on technique, not strength or athletic ability.

 

Mr. Parker himself believed that the art of Kenpo should be tailored to the student. In his own words, “Like a custom tailor who fits a suit to an individual, so should the Art fit the individual.” He strongly believed that in the pursuit of the art of self-defense, tradition should give away to effectiveness. As such, the art is readily adjusted to each individual practitioner.

 
My child has a learning/physical disability. Can he/she participate in Kenpo?

 

Yes. Our instructors have experience in teaching such students and we can make accommodation for most learning or physical disabilities. We have designed our classes and rank system to challenge the individual to be the best martial artist that they can be. We do not judge one student’s performance against another. Instead, we judge an individual’s progress against their own potential.

 
My child has Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Will he/she benefit from the martial arts?

 

The answer is a resounding YES!!! ADHD children need a very structured environment that has clear-cut boundaries, rules, and goals. One of the main goals for children at Camarillo Kenpo is to help them maintain concentration and focus. This will be directly beneficial to any child who suffers from ADHD.

 

Additionally, our instructors have experience in teaching children with ADHD. We stress patience and understanding with all of our students.

 

During the classes, your child will be given an outlet to release any extra energy he or she may have. This will lead to a better night sleep, and a better night sleep will help optimize your child’s success on a daily basis.

 
My child is interested in the martial arts, but don’t they promote violence?

 

Many people have the misconception that the martial arts promote violence, when in fact the opposite is true. Although we teach self-defense through blocking, kicking and punching, we use Kenpo as a vehicle for teaching life skills such as respect, discipline, self-confidence, focus, regular physical exercise, improved coordination, healthy athletic competition, academic success, avoiding peer pressure, leadership, and quieting the mind. It’s true that all of this can come from learning to block, punch and kick.

 

Some people worry that learning the martial arts will foster a sense of violence and give bullies the skills they need to continue harming others. Martial arts actually do the opposite. A common characteristic of bullies is that they lack impulse control and don’t know how to manage their anger. Martial arts can help to solve these problems in that they help reduce stress, improve concentration and control, and teach respect of others. In this sense, martial arts also help children who are bullied because it gives them the self-confidence they need to combat bullying before it even starts.

 

The reality is that one of your child’s first and biggest challenges in life will not come from being accosted on the street or threatened by the playground bully, it will come from within. The challenge they will face is their own fear and self-doubt. Here at Camarillo Kenpo our programs are designed to help your child face up to this challenge. In fact, thousands of years of martial arts training have shown that through the proper training children can be shown how to approach the world and those they meet from a place of confidence and peace, not from a place of fear. And this can make all the difference in the world.

 

All of the instructors at Camarillo Kenpo teach their students from day one that using the martial arts is only for self-defense and as a last resort. If there is a problem with a student picking fights, bullying, or just showing off, our instructors want to know about it immediately so they can deal with the problem before it becomes worse. Promotion and rank can be a powerful motivator in a child’s life. We make it well known that rank can continue to be worn only if the student displays the proper respect and attitude outside, as well as inside, the studio.

 

Finally, many psychologists and therapists recommend martial arts for children with behavioral problems and learning disabilities. It is through the motivation that the martial arts provide that our instructors are able to teach practical ways to control anger.

 
My child is interested in the martial arts, but I’m afraid they will get hurt?

 

While anything is possible if a child is involved in any physical activity, the chances of your child being injured are actually less than if your child was involved in many other sports such as football, basketball, ice hockey, etc.

 

Students participating in our classes will be supervised 100% of the time. Also, before any techniques or physical contact is permitted, all of the students are taught the proper approach to minimize potential injuries to themselves and their training partners.

 
Can I get my black belt in less than two years?

 

Imagine you approached a piano teacher and asked them how long it would take to become an expert pianist. Then imagine they immediately responded that it would take you two years and would cost three thousand dollars. Would you take them up on their offer? Of course not. That would be a ridiculous statement for any teacher to make. Being an expert in anything takes dedication, time and patience.

 

The American Heritage dictionary defines Black Belt as- The rank of expert in a system of self defense such as Judo or Karate. The same dictionary further defines an Expert as- A person with a high degree of skill in, or knowledge of, a certain subject. Kenpo Karate embraces the fact that a Kenpo Black Belt is a practitioner who is not only an expert in the art of self-defense, he/she is a teacher and a role model. Our Black Belts exemplify hard work, dedication, and excellence.

 

We live in a ‘microwave society’. But a true black belt cannot be earned in a short amount of time. It requires dedication, desire and perseverance. If your desire is to earn your black belt in as short a time as possible, then Kenpo is not the martial art for you. But, if your desire is to dedicate yourself towards being an expert in one of the best martial arts in the world, an expert in one of the most effective self-defense systems on the street today, and a role model to those who desire to live in a just and moral society, then you have found your new family and home.

 

So, the question “How long will it take to earn my Black Belt?” is impossible to answer. Every individual is different. It will depend on how much time you spend in class and practicing on your own. It will depend on your own level of dedication. The only thing that we can tell you for sure is that becoming an ‘expert’ is not accomplished overnight. Being a Black Belt is a way of life. But the sense of accomplishment you feel when you do earn your Black Belt will be well worth the effort. And the sense of pride you feel knowing that you earned your rank, and didn’t just pay the required fee or spend the minimum amount of required time, will reassure you that you made the right decision and are studying a true martial art with depth and sophistication, and not just a sport.

 
What is the difference between Tae Kwon Do and Kenpo?

 

Tae Kwon Do (TKD) comes from Korea. It is an Olympic sport and some TKD practitioners train exclusively in this version of the art. TKD is unique in that it uses a much higher ratio of kicks compared with hand techniques than in other arts. There is also more emphasis on higher kicks to the head level. Practitioners of TKD utilize more jumping or flying kicks where one is airborne while executing kicking techniques. In addition, the Korean forms or Katas are generally a bit shorter and less sophisticated than other martial art forms.

 

Kenpo, on the other hand, is a practical self defense system which trains students for modern day self-defense encounters. It is not an Olympic sport, and never will be. Kenpo students are taught to use their hands and feet with multiple strikes to multiple targets on each attacker, in a multiple attack situation. Instead of relying on strength or athletic ability, Kenpo relies on technique. To understand why we must realize that in our younger years we tend to feel confident relying heavily on our strength and athletic ability. However, as we age, or strength and athletic ability become ‘less reliable’. Kenpo practitioners feel that their art can be more readily utilized throughout their entire life because of its reliance on technique instead of being in top physical shape.

 
What is the difference between Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) and Kenpo?

 

What once began as no-rules cage fighting has evolved into Mixed Martial Arts (MMA). MMA is a full contact combat sport that allows a wide variety of fighting techniques, from a mixture of martial arts traditions and non-traditions, to be used in competitions. The fighters battle it out one-on-one in an eight-sided, caged ring. The only way to win is to knock out the opponent, force them to tap out employing a submission, or to succeed by the decision of the judges. The rules allow the use of striking and grappling techniques, both while standing and on the ground. Such competitions allow martial artist of different backgrounds to compete.

 

The term MMA may also be used however less correctly to describe hybrid martial arts styles.

 

Modern mixed martial arts competition emerged in American popular culture in 1993 with the founding of the Ultimate Fighting Championship. Initially based on finding the most effective martial arts for real unarmed combat situations, competitors of various arts were pitted against one another with minimal rules or concern for safety. In the following decade, MMA promoters adopted many additional rules aimed at increasing safety for competitors and to promote mainstream acceptance of the sport. Following these changes, the sport has seen increased popularity with pay per view reach rivaling boxing and professional wrestling.

 

The difference between MMA and Kenpo is relatively simple. MMA is a sport in that combat takes place between two competitors isolated in a cage. Kenpo, on the other hand, is a complete self-defense system and a well rounded martial art. Since Kenpo is designed to be a realistic self-defense system that is practical in today’s streets, it takes into account the realities of how assaults happen. No matter how an assault occurs, whether it is the result of a bar room argument, a bully on a playground, or a mugging downtown, many times the assailant is not alone. Aggressive predators often gain courage by virtue of the fact that they have their buddies there to back them up. However, if there are others around to do you harm, the last thing you want to do is be completely focused on only one assailant and the last place you want to be is on the ground, fully committed to fighting a single individual as is common with the grappling arts and MMA, where any number of additional assailants can sneak up on you. In contrast, the Kenpoist is trained to stay on their feet to react to anything that comes their way, or to make their escape if possible.

 

It can be argued that MMA is not well rounded as a self-defense training system in that the entire training focus is one one-on-one combat in a cage where the combatants are assured that they face only one competitor who will follow the rules. On today’s streets, you get no such assurance.

 
How do I pick a martial arts studio?

 

There are many things to consider when learning about, and ultimately picking, a martial art from one of the many wonderful styles there are to choose from. Here are some important points to consider:

 

Contemporary versus traditional art
‘Soft’ or ‘hard’ art
Stand-up striking art versus grappling
Self-defense versus sport
Martial art versus a workout style

 

Contemporary versus Traditional Art

A number of Contemporary Martial Arts exist today, some based on a modern study of self defense and armed or unarmed personal combat tactics, some based on historic martial arts systems, and some which are an eclectic blend of different sources. Some Martial Arts have historically focused on the teaching and learning of ‘secrets and tricks’ accompanied by occult ceremonies and rigid schooling methods. Contemporary Martial Arts, by contrast, focus on clear and communicable understandings of strategic and tactical principles, varieties of learning styles and modern teaching methods, psychology, physical culture, anatomy, nutrition and physiology, physics and body mechanics. The focus is less on trying to duplicate legendary and mythical feats of prowess and more on developing practical methods of achieving attainable goals and self-defense.

 

‘Soft’ or ‘Hard’ Art

Martial arts techniques can be effected in a ‘hard’ or a ‘soft’ manner.

In a soft technique the receiver uses the aggressor's force and momentum against him by leading the attack in a direction where the receiver will be positioned in advantage, then, in a seamless movement, the receiver effects an appropriate martial arts technique. The goal of soft arts is said to be able to turn an adversary's force to their disadvantage, and to use the least possible amount of force oneself.

A hard technique by contrast meets force with force, either by directly blocking the technique with a head-on force or by cutting through at an angle with one's own force. This can also serve as an example of the receiver using the aggressor's force and momentum against them. It is sometimes claimed that hard styles rely primarily on superior strength or conditioning to be successful, but practitioners of these styles would claim that it is the mechanics of their blocking actions that results in success rather than raw power as such.

Some martial artists refer to styles or arts as being hard or soft.

A hard style or hard martial art, such as Muay Thai and Tae Kwon Do, employs predominantly or exclusively hard techniques.

Soft styles or soft martial arts, such as Aikido and the Chinese internal martial arts, employ many soft techniques.

Many martial arts combine hard and soft techniques. Such arts are usually called ‘hard/soft’. The Chinese martial arts emphasize a balance of yin and yang. In some styles these represent softness and hardness, respectively. One should yield (yin) to hard force (yang); inversely, one should attack (yang) a soft (yin) opponent. Other uses of this doctrine state the study of yin and yang involve offensive and defensive responses; if one is struck on the left, one can effectively counter-strike from the right, if a low kick comes in, strike high, if a high punch comes in, kick low. As well, if one initiates these sorts of attacks, one should be aware of the simultaneous defensive liabilities involved.

 

Stand-up Striking Art versus Grappling

Grappling refers to the gripping, handling, and controlling of an opponent without the use of striking, typically through the application of various grappling holds, choke holds, and counters to various hold attempts. Grappling forms an important part of both ground fighting and standing clinch fighting. Sports that use grappling include Brazilian jiu-jitsu, catch wrestling, Judo, Luta Livre Esportiva, mixed martial arts (MMA), Sambo, and wrestling.

To be able to execute a strike in martial arts, it normally requires a person to be in an upright position. So the striking or stand up martial arts style is one where combatants are fighting while standing up and do not end up grappling or fighting so close to the ground. Fighters attack and defend themselves while on their feet by using kicks, punches, blocks, knee and elbow strikes. How they use these limbs to execute and fend off an attack greatly depends on the martial art they practice since each has its own unique way of doing it.

 

Self-defense versus Sport

Martial arts can further be differentiated into those whose main emphasis is self-defense versus those whose main emphasis is sport. It is important to bear in mind that it would be unusual for an individual martial art style to put all of its emphasis into only one of these two extremes.

Martial art styles that emphasize the sport side of their art are mainly concerned with how the movements they teach look and/or how to score points in a tournament setting. Generally, in such a sport style there is ‘no contact’ between participants.

Conversely, martial art styles that emphasize the self-defense side of their art are mainly concerned with being able to protect themselves if attacked. Commonly in such a studio ‘light’ contact is permitted between participants.

 

Martial Art versus a Workout Style

Although Wikipedia defines a martial art as a system of codified practices and traditions of training for combat, throughout history, and still today, martial artists feel that there is a bigger connotation attached. To many, a true martial artist is a person who studies not only the art of war, but the art of peace and strives to become a complete, well rounded individual. As such, the martial arts permeate every facet of a practitioner’s life. Those who prescribe to this way of thought believe that a martial artist has the responsibility to strive to do their best in mind, body, spirit, profession, relationships, and morality.

Conversely, there are a number of workout styles that have martial arts moves incorporated in them, such as kicks and punches. However, these workout styles are not intended as a complete self-defense system, or as a way of life, and are heavily slanted towards physical fitness alone. Therefore, it is generally accepted that these workout systems do not fall under the heading of marital art. Examples include Cardio Kickboxing, Tae Bo®, and others.

 

American Kenpo Karate

American Kenpo Karate is a martial arts system that can be traced back to the late Senior Grandmaster, Mr. Ed Parker. Kenpo is characterized by the use of quick moves in rapid-fire succession intended to overwhelm an opponent. It is largely derived from traditional Southern Chinese kung fu and other martial arts found in the cultural melting pot of Hawaii. Mr. Parker brought Kenpo to the Mainland from his native Hawaii in 1953 and subsequently developed it into the most comprehensive Martial Art System in the world today.

Kenpo is very much a contemporary martial art. It is practical and realistic, and can readily be applied in today's environment. Kenpo encompasses logical principles and concepts along with scientific disciplines not employed by other martial art systems.

Kenpo is generally considered a hard/soft art. Depending on the situation, the Kenpo practitioner would meet an opponent with a head on strike or turn the opponent’s strike against him, which ever approach would be most beneficial to his well being.

Kenpo is predominately a stand-up striking style. Since Kenpo is designed to be a realistic self-defense system that is practical in today’s streets, it takes into account the realities of how assaults happen. No matter how an assault occurs, whether it is the result of a bar room argument, a bully on a playground, or a mugging downtown, many times the assailant is not alone. Aggressive predators often gain courage by virtue of the fact that they have their buddies there to back them up. We Kenpo practitioners believe that grappling works best if you are guaranteed to have a one-on-one conflict. However, if there are others around to do you harm, the last place you want to be is on the ground, fully committed to fighting a single individual, where any number of additional assailants can sneak up on you. In contrast, the Kenpoist is trained to stay on their feet to react to anything that comes their way, or to make their escape if possible.

At Camarillo Kenpo Karate, we teach a self-defense system and not just a sport. We believe that if a student never makes contact with their partner in training, then they will have a difficult time using their training effectively if ever attacked for real. In essence, we believe that the street, with all the stress and adrenaline of a real life confrontation, is not the place to learn what it is like to make aggressive contact with another human being. It is important to remember though that we employ ‘light’ contact in a controlled manner, and we use every means possible to prevent injuries.

Finally, Kenpo is a complete martial art in every sense. We strive to become true martial artists. We believe that a black belt is not just something you wear on the mat in the studio; it is a way of life.

 
Can you give me a breakdown of some common martial arts?

 

Aikido-

Uses opponent’s momentum and strength against them, redirecting the force, instead of blocking it. The idea is not to ever use strength against strength. Aikido is very defensive.

 

Ju-Jitsu (Brazilian and Japanese)-

Brazilian ju-jitsu is more of a grappling, ground fighting system, where the object is to submit your opponent through joint locks (such as an arm-bar or kimura) or you can choke your opponent out by getting in a dominant position and using a combination of your arms and or legs to choke them (triangle choke uses legs, rear choke uses arms). Your opponent ‘taps’, to signal his submission and that the match is over.

 

Karate-

Karate originates in Okinawa, but many styles were adopted and modified in Japan. There are many different types of Karate (Shotokan, Gen-wa-ki, Kempo, Kenpo, Kyokoshin, Goju, Isshin-Ryu). Karate also usually incorporates weapons training into its system using the traditional Budo weapons (Staff, Nunchaku, Tonfa, Kama, Sai). Empty hand Karate utilizes punches and kicks.

 

Kendo-

Kendo is sword/stick fighting. They wear a type of armor/face shield and fight with bamboo swords.

 

Kung Fu/Tai Chi-

Chinese in origin. Although Tai Chi can be used in self defense, it is primarily used as exercise around the world. It is believed that there are many unexplainable health benefits in practicing Tai Chi. The Chinese believe that all life has an inner force called ‘Chi’. Tai Chi is a means of channeling and releasing one's Chi and therefore reaping the benefits. The concept of Chi is not exclusive to Tai Chi. It is part of all types of Chinese Kung Fu and is known as ‘Ki’ in Japanese and Korean martial arts. The concept is typically considered part of all traditional martial arts.

 
Tae Kwon Do (TKD)-

Tae Kwon Do comes from Korea. It is an Olympic sport and some TKD practitioners train exclusively in this version of the art. TKD is unique in that it uses a much higher ratio of kicks compared with hand techniques than in other arts. There is also more emphasis on higher kicks to the head level. Practitioners of TKD utilize more jumping or flying kicks where one is airborne while executing kicking techniques. In addition, the Korean forms or Katas are generally a bit shorter and less sophisticated than other martial art forms.

 

American Kenpo Karate-

American Kenpo Karate is a martial arts system that can be traced back to the late Senior Grandmaster, Mr. Ed Parker. Kenpo is characterized by the use of quick moves in rapid-fire succession intended to overwhelm an opponent. It is largely derived from traditional Southern Chinese kung fu and other martial arts found in the cultural melting pot of Hawaii. Mr. Parker brought Kenpo to the Mainland from his native Hawaii in 1953 and subsequently developed it into the most comprehensive Martial Art System in the world today. Kenpo is very much a contemporary martial art. It is practical and realistic, and can readily be applied in today's environment. Kenpo encompasses logical principles and concepts along with scientific disciplines not employed by other martial art systems. Kenpo is generally considered a hard/soft art. Depending on the situation, the Kenpo practitioner would meet an opponent with a head on strike or turn the opponent’s strike against him, which ever approach would be most beneficial to his well being. Kenpo is predominately a stand-up striking style. Since Kenpo is designed to be a realistic self-defense system that is practical in today’s streets, it takes into account the realities of how assaults happen. No matter how an assault occurs, whether it is the result of a bar room argument, a bully on a playground, or a mugging downtown, many times the assailant is not alone. Aggressive predators often gain courage by virtue of the fact that they have their buddies there to back them up. We Kenpo practitioners believe that grappling works best if you are guaranteed to have a one-on-one conflict. However, if there are others around to do you harm, the last place you want to be is on the ground, fully committed to fighting a single individual, where any number of additional assailants can sneak up on you. In contrast, the Kenpoist is trained to stay on their feet to react to anything that comes their way, or to make their escape if possible. At Camarillo Kenpo Karate, we teach a self-defense system and not just a sport. We believe that if a student never makes contact with their partner in training, then they will have a difficult time using their training effectively if ever attacked for real. In essence, we believe that the street, with all the stress and adrenaline of a real life confrontation, is not the place to learn what it is like to make aggressive contact with another human being. It is important to remember though that we employ ‘light’ contact in a controlled manner, and we use every means possible to prevent injuries. Finally, Kenpo is a complete martial art in every sense. We strive to become true martial artists. We believe that a black belt is not just something you wear on the mat in the studio; it is a way of life.